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Factors Occupancy Facility Design, Successful Construction Four and Cultivation to

vintosos
07.06.2018

Content:

  • Factors Occupancy Facility Design, Successful Construction Four and Cultivation to
  • Building Enclosure Design Principles and Strategies
  • Building Types
  • A comprehensive overview of traditional marketing channels, the corresponding unique challenges and pitfalls that ancillary services, cannabis brands and. By targeting human factors through facility design and ensuring that latent conditions and For purposes of this study, nurses' work areas were divided into four Comparatively, environmental risk factors for patients in multiple occupancy . have experienced successful outcomes in their new and renovated facilities. Warehouses, defined here, are facilities that provide a proper environment car parking spaces if space configuration changes through effective site design. other building aspects, such as aisle widths, lighting design, need for . from predesign, design, and construction through occupancy and reuse.

    Factors Occupancy Facility Design, Successful Construction Four and Cultivation to

    View enlarged picking alternatives. Design of warehouses is to be based on the dead and live load requirements of the structure as it will be built. Snow, wind, and seismic loads shall be considered where they are applicable.

    Racking in seismic areas must be built stronger and be better braced. Wind uplift can cause great damage to roofs and metal roof copings at the roof edge. Building codes recognize that wind velocity is greater across open areas, typical for warehouse zones. Wind-driven rain can easily penetrate the vast surface areas of the warehouse walls. Design walls to permit any infiltrating water to evaporate harmlessly without collecting in the wall cavities or damaging stored product.

    Proper floor types are an important consideration in the design. General warehouse space should be floored with a concrete slab to carry wheel loads and withstand the abrasion generated by the continual use of hard rubber and steel-wheeled forklift trucks. Consider adding hardeners and dustproofers to protect the concrete. Consider using epoxy coating on concrete floors near battery charging areas.

    Floor flatness and levelness requirements are critical, especially for high ceilinged space and safe operation of high-lifting equipment. Dock heights on the truck side of the terminal should be approximately 4'—40" above the pavement, with appropriate ramps, scissor lifts, or dock levelers at each truck berth to safely bring the height of the truck bed in line with the dock height.

    Tops of doors should be high enough to accommodate full height pallet handling from the highest trucks. Dock heights on the rail side of the terminal should be approximately 3'—9" above the top of the rail to ensure that the rail car floor is even with the dock floor.

    Dock widths and areas inside exterior doors leading to dock space must be planned for maneuverability of forklift trucks and other expected types of material handling equipment. Consider using a non-slip finish on the concrete floor near loading areas for safety.

    Be designed with passive solar concepts , solar geometry, and building load requirements in mind. Possess light colored roof to reflect a large percentage of solar radiation, reducing HVAC loads, and energy consumption. First cost is also reduced, due to the smaller plant size required. When a large roof area is anticipated, this effect can be significant, especially for temperature controlled warehouses. Greater heat reflection will increase wroker productivity in the summer. Be planned with interior dock space in colder climates to reduce energy consumption and provide more tolerable winter working conditions for dock workers.

    Use ceiling mounted fans to reduce heat stratification and provide air movement, thus increasing worker comfort in both summer and winter. Mount fans above highest forklift level for worker safety. Consider specifying white painted metal roof decking, thereby increasing ceiling surface reflectivity, lighting efficiency, and worker comfort without any added energy cost.

    Use energy-efficient fixtures, systems, and appliances , e. Address the traditional life-safety and health concerns common to all buildings, including measures to prevent occupational injuries and illnesses work-related musculoskeletal disorders WMSD , trips, falls, etc. The following operations have historically contributed to significant numbers of warehouse injuries and are considered to be the most hazardous: Other serious operational safety problems include inadequate fire safety provisions, improper blocking of exits and egress paths, chemical exposure, improper use of lockout procedures, lack of ergonomics, and failure to wear personal protective equipment.

    Incorporate proper signage to clearly warn of hazards or to direct personnel to take precaution. The specific strategy for the warehouses signs must be determined early in the facility design process. Possess non-slip surface treatments on floors subject to wetting, such as outdoor docks, to eliminate slips and falls to personnel. Be designed with fire sprinkler systems engineered to cover the specific commodity classification in the specific storage configuration for the planned warehouse.

    The adequacy of the sprinkler system must be evaluated when changes occur that can increase the hazard classification, such as introducing a new product line, using a different packaging material, or changing from wood pallets to plastic pallets.

    Include appropriate security systems incorporated into the overall warehouse design. Provide proper ventilation under all circumstances. Provide local exhaust for restrooms, kitchens, janitor's closets, copy rooms, battery-charging areas, etc. Integrate daylighting with the electric lighting system. Allow for natural lighting where possible. Provide lighting controls that turn off lights when sufficient daylight exists.

    Consider dimming controls that continuously adjust lighting levels to respond to daylight conditions. Use furnishings, chairs, and equipment that are ergonomically designed and approved for that use. Carpet was chosen, however, for the alcoves and hallways, with a low-nap, special carpet for hospital application. Special ceiling tiles that absorb noise better than regular ceiling tiles were chosen. Triple glazed windows were specified to minimize outside noises.

    No overhead paging system is used except for public emergencies such as a tornado warning , and nurse call systems use minimal tone with vibrating features. As specific equipment and technologies were needed, manufacturers of that piece of equipment or technology were contacted and asked how they reduced noise in their products. Many design and construction concepts can be applied to achieve a scalable e.

    Space around the bed is sized so procedures e. The importance of being able to see patients is inherent to nursing care, a concept that was recognized early by Florence Nightingale, who advocated the design of open, long hospital wards to see all patients.

    The design of units and patient rooms should allow caregivers to be in visual proximity to patients; a pod structure can allow close proximity and enable quality care by improving efficiency and effectiveness.

    The nurse can also check on the patient in the evening without opening the door and waking the patient. Each room is wired for cameras for observation.

    All materials, such as medication, linens, IV poles, and a rough-in for icemakers, are delivered to the alcove to allow nurses to spend more time with the patient. The chart will initially be in the room, but shortly after the new hospital opens, it will be replaced by electronic medical records with a workspace so nurses and other caregivers can spend more time with the patient. Furthermore, visibility also means lighting to see the patient.

    Natural light is maximized by large windows in every patient room. Light sources after hours are as close to natural light as can be achieved cost effectively. Canned lights are located over the patient for assessment. A total of 15 lights are located in every room, including the bathroom and alcoves. The IOM 9 found that many patients have expressed frustration with their inability to participate in decisionmaking, to obtain information they need, to be heard, and to participate in systems of care that are responsive to their needs.

    The availability of information for patients increases their knowledge regarding their illness and treatment options, and being informed gives patients the opportunity to participate in shared decisionmaking with clinicians and may help patients better articulate their individual views and preferences.

    A couch folds outs into a bed; a desk with an Internet connection encourages family members or friends to stay with patients. This is intended to help patients to be more active with their care and better able to protect themselves from errors. A portable computer on a cart same one used by staff is located in each room so patients can have appropriate access to their chart. Standardization has been documented as an important human factors-based design strategy 4 , 64 that can help lessen the number of errors.

    Standardization reduces reliance on short-term memory and allows those unfamiliar with a specific process or design to use it safely. There were many design elements that incorporated standardization as a physical attribute.

    The patient rooms in St. The headwalls are standardized throughout the facility; a seven-drawer configuration was designed into every patient room or alcove to provide consistency of supply locations and to simplify the restocking of those supplies. This provides staff with a known constant, regardless of where they may be caring for a patient throughout the facility due to floating, a patient resuscitation, or some other emergent situation.

    The electronic medical record, use of bar-coding, computerized provider order entry, and other technologies will be standardized eventually, assisting in the development of standardized protocols and order sets. The facility materials distribution and routine nurse functions can also be standardized to match the facility.

    Equipment is not fully standardized yet, but that is the goal, since fully standardized equipment provides the highest level of safety. The complexity and variety in equipment vendors and models is immense, and this complexity creates more errors.

    This weakness—the lack of equipment standardization—was pointed out continually in using failure and effects mode analysis.

    The hospital was able to purchase limited new patient monitoring equipment, and took care to assure that new and existing equipment were from the same vendor to give the user a similar feel and functionality, regardless of which equipment they were using. The hospital will continue to utilize this process to guarantee long-term equipment standardization within the facility.

    The IOM identified health information technology solutions as a necessary component to improving patient safety. These applications are intended to allow caregivers to give care more efficiently and rely less on short-term memory. Many design features and technology applications have affected multiple latent conditions. This was one of the important criteria used at the matrix exercise to determine which design features to include.

    Technology applications were deemed to be a critical part of allowing St. In order to provide patients with the most accurate diagnosis and treatment possible, clinicians need to have complete, real-time information about the patient, care needs, and treatment options.

    Technologies such as the Internet, electronic medical records, and clinical decision-support systems can accomplish this. When the hospital opened, the patient chart was percent paper based. In traditional hospital environments, the patient chart changes location without regard to patient activities.

    Early mornings, a physician may come around and take the chart to a quiet dictation area to write notes and orders. The chart is often left there until another care provider requires the chart.

    A transitional plan was developed to meet this guiding principle: This was surprisingly effective and compliance was unusually high. The unit clerk then transcribes the order and does any necessary computer order entry in the alcove.

    The chart never leaves the alcove. Anecdotally, the physicians find this process useful to them. They can make rounds more efficiently, since they never have to look for a chart to write their notes or orders. Verbal orders are also reduced. For obvious reasons, this process will cease to be relevant when the electronic medical record is implemented. Fatigue has been identified as a contributing factor to human error.

    Other considerations in the design of St. Transferring patients from one unit, room, or floor to another puts both the patient and staff at risk of harm, and it is disruptive to both patients and clinicians. Often these transfers involve handoffs, which, as described in another chapter in this book, also place the patient and clinician at risk for errors.

    Minimizing patient transfers and handoffs has design implications. Private single rooms with appropriate space around the beds, lifts, and other safety mechanisms allow more procedures to be performed in the room.

    This is similar to the model in obstetrics with Labor Delivery Recovery Post-Partum LDRP rooms, where the mother delivers the child and the child can remain with the mother in the same room for the entire stay. Another example is the physical therapy gym located on the med-surg unit—the patient never leaves the unit to obtain therapy, and their nurse is always in close proximity should a change in patient condition occur.

    Electronic medical records are another important tool. Bar-coding helps with continually and accurately identifying the patient. The approaches used by St. These are all features that minimize infection. Air supply and return grates that need cleaning have been upgraded to stainless steel so cleaning is more effective. However, the most important design element is the location of the sink, since lack of hand washing is the number one reason for hospital-acquired infections.

    The two most common methods are jumping and hanging. To minimize jumping, windows cannot be opened, and they are triple-paned, making them much harder to break through. If a suicide-risk patient is identified, that patient is transferred to the mental health unit, but increased visibility in all patient rooms helps staff keep a closer watch, which helps minimize the risk of suicides.

    The new beds ordered for the hospital have eliminated many of the risks of deaths due to restraints. With less and less restraints, however, the risk of falls rises. Most patients fall at night or while walking with a nurse or other caregiver. Design elements that help reduce falls include fixed night lights in every room, beds that drop down to sixteen inches above the floor, locating the bathroom at the head of the bed with railings to the stool and shower, and utilizing bathroom lights that automatically turn on when anyone enters the bathroom.

    Besides the above-mentioned strategies, a bed-exit system is being explored using infrared technology. If a patient is identified as he is trying to get out of bed, then lights could turn on, an emergency call to the pager could occur, or a voice could ask the patient to wait for a caregiver.

    Such a system is in design at St. All connectors are a different size for different gases and color-coded. Storage and identification of portable gases employ the same identification program. All gases are in standardized locations to further minimize the risk of a gas-connecting error. Operating room suites were standardized, using proper lighting and cable access to digital images and photographs of the surgery site.

    Bar-coding, unit doses at point of service, electronic medical records, and physician order entry are critical elements for medication error reduction. Private rooms with alcoves that include medical records allow nurses to concentrate on one patient and document those efforts, before moving on to the next patient. The use of failure mode and effects analysis, patient focus groups, mock-ups with employee evaluation, and checklist safety design principles latent conditions and active failures helped St.

    The patient room evolved over months of design. Over 27 different designs or refinements were made on the patient room. This room is not the only way a patient room can be designed for safety, but it is believed to be a good way, and it exhibits efficient, thoughtful features that meet National Learning Lab expectations. The National Learning Lab had a powerful effect on St. The importance of nursing leadership in the whole process cannot be overstated. Without the commitment, knowledge, and perseverance of the nursing leadership, along with the chief executive officer, board, medical staff, architects, and the rest of the design teams, a safe design would not have occurred.

    The effort of St. The impact of the National Learning Lab recommendations on processes also offers an immense opportunity to improve the safety of patients in hospitals.

    The work of St. The building of the new hospital was completed in , and investigators are currently evaluating the impact of their designs on the frequency of adverse events and patient outcomes.

    Using innovative architectural and design features to enhance patient safety together with institutionalizing a nonpunitive safety culture can potentially have a greater impact than design features alone. Over the past few years, the National Learning Lab changed St. Leaders and clinicians at St. This should lead to less human error and potential harm and more efficient operations process.

    Yet, one of the major difficulties of translating this efficiency and better outcomes into improved net income is the basic misalignment of financial incentives.

    Both the fee-for-service and the DRG diagnosis-related group introduce perverse incentives. Hospital revenues can actually be reduced as a result of improved safety, and savings can accrue to the insurance companies and not the institutions creating the improvements.

    Although there is some evidence of changes to improve these misaligned incentives, more dramatic changes are needed to encourage safe process redesign. The evidence base is growing in support of evidence-based design for renovations and new building. The new field of evidence-based design has emerged at a time when there is a health care construction boom.

    Based on the Gurses and Carayon study, 54 care processes will need to be modified to address inefficiencies caused by distractions e. Nurses need to be involved and have an active role in evaluating, planning, and testing the layout of patient units and patient rooms to ensure a healing and comfortable environment for both patients and clinicians.

    Lessons learned should be shared with others to enable improvements across the country, not just on one facility.

    Current laws and regulations will need to be modified to support new hospital standards and building codes. The impact of the built environment will most likely be magnified by concurrent efforts to change organization culture and functionality as well as processes of care delivery, but future research would need to so demonstrate.

    Since the majority of the research on the impact of the built environment has been conducted in specific units in hospital settings, it will be important to investigate whether similar effects can be realized in general medical-surgical units and outpatient settings, including clinics and offices.

    What are the effects of the built environment on the quality of communication and information sharing between clinicians, patients, and families? What is the relationship between environmental factors and the working conditions for clinicians? What are the best mechanisms and designs for facilitating effective hand washing?

    What is the effect of elements in the built environment that reduce staff fatigue, distractions, and stress? And what is the role of the built environment in decreasing infection rates across patient types? Nurses can have a critical role in addressing these and other research gaps.

    In this relatively new and exciting area of research in health care, nurses need to and should be actively involved throughout the research and quality improvement processes involving the design of the work environment space. In the next few years, hospital leaders will be involved in new hospital construction projects to meet the changing marketplace demands associated with the growing demand of an aging population. Many clinicians, architects, and hospital administrators believe that the hospital built environment can benefit the satisfaction of health care providers as well as patient satisfaction and outcomes.

    There is some evidence that the built environment may influence patient and family perceptions of the quality of and satisfaction with care received during a hospitalization. There is also some evidence that nurse satisfaction with the built environment was related to general well-being and job satisfaction, two factors that are critical because of their impact on patient care.

    The evidence-base is emerging to support the business case that designing for safety and quality can improve patient outcomes and safety, promote healing, increase patient satisfaction, and reduce costs.

    It is thought that the cost of building or remodeling projects based on design evidence conducive to patient safety can result in organizational savings over time, without adversely impacting revenues. Those building new or remodeling current facilities should consider beginning with transitioning to a culture of safety, then using a safe design as a matter of focusing on maximizing the safety features without expending additional capital resources.

    While relatively new, evidence is growing in objective assessments of the impact of built environments, particularly around the issue of infection control. Some safety features will cost more than traditionally designed facilities e.

    Most of the articles identified in the literature search were primarily descriptive. Three hundred abstracts were obtained. To be considered evidence in this review, the research had to involve nurses or patients in clinical settings, reported findings related to patient safety, and not be specific only to health information technology. Turn recording back on. National Center for Biotechnology Information , U.

    Show details Hughes RG, editor. Background Recent attention in health care has been on the actual architectural design of a hospital facility, including its technology and equipment, and its effect on patient safety.

    Human Error and Cognitive Functioning by Design Cognitive psychologists have identified the physical environment as having a significant impact on safety and human performance.

    Factors Influencing the Built Environment With human factors in mind, there are several aspects of the built environment that should be considered. Safety , including applying the design and improving the availability of assistive devices to avert patient falls. Effectiveness , including use of lighting to enable visual performance.

    Efficiency , including standardizing room layout, location of supplies and medical equipment. Equity , by ensuring the size, layout, and functions of the structure meet the diverse care needs of patients. Nurse staffing levels Preventable adverse events such as falls and complications have been found to be related to both the design of health care facilities and nurse staffing levels.

    Structural obstacles and the nature of work for nurses Several factors have been identified as physically being in the way of the work of nurses. Single-bed and variable-acuity rooms Debate continues as to whether hospitals should have single-bed rooms or semiprivate rooms for patients. Lessons From Best-Practice Designs There are several examples of the impact of evidence-based design in acute care settings; a few will be discussed here. Research Evidence There were 10 original articles that met the inclusion criteria for this review.

    Acuity-Adaptable Rooms One study investigated the impact of an evidence-based design of 56 new acuity-adaptable rooms for a combined coronary critical care and step-down unit. Designed ICU The implementation of a new neonatal intensive care unit, designed to have a more efficient floor plan, provide space for supportive family-centered care, and to use of natural light, used was assessed using multiple methods. A Case Study One new bed community hospital in Wisconsin has been designed to improve patient safety through research-based design.

    The specific safety design principles, intended to specifically address both latent conditions and active failures, included the following: Design to prevent adverse events e. Designing for Nursing Care The first step for the National Learning Lab was an educational program about human error and its causes associated with latent conditions and active failures.

    Single-Patient Room In many instances, including the need for patient isolation measures, double or multiple-occupancy rooms were viewed as not being conducive to patient safety and quality care. Figure 2 Single-Patient Room in St. Noise reduction Noise interferes with communication, creates distractions, affects cognitive performance and concentration, and contributes to stress and fatigue.

    Scalability, adaptability, flexibility Many design and construction concepts can be applied to achieve a scalable e. Visibility of patients to staff The importance of being able to see patients is inherent to nursing care, a concept that was recognized early by Florence Nightingale, who advocated the design of open, long hospital wards to see all patients. Involving patients in their care The IOM 9 found that many patients have expressed frustration with their inability to participate in decisionmaking, to obtain information they need, to be heard, and to participate in systems of care that are responsive to their needs.

    Standardization Standardization has been documented as an important human factors-based design strategy 4 , 64 that can help lessen the number of errors. Automation where possible The IOM identified health information technology solutions as a necessary component to improving patient safety.

    Immediate accessibility of information, close to the point of service In order to provide patients with the most accurate diagnosis and treatment possible, clinicians need to have complete, real-time information about the patient, care needs, and treatment options.

    Minimizing fatigue Fatigue has been identified as a contributing factor to human error. Death of patients in restraints, patient falls St. Correct tube—correct connector—correct hole placement events, oxygen cylinder hazards All connectors are a different size for different gases and color-coded. Wrong-site surgery Operating room suites were standardized, using proper lighting and cable access to digital images and photographs of the surgery site.

    Medication and transfusion-related adverse events Bar-coding, unit doses at point of service, electronic medical records, and physician order entry are critical elements for medication error reduction. Bringing It All Together at St. Practice Implications The evidence base is growing in support of evidence-based design for renovations and new building.

    Research Implications The impact of the built environment will most likely be magnified by concurrent efforts to change organization culture and functionality as well as processes of care delivery, but future research would need to so demonstrate. Conclusions In the next few years, hospital leaders will be involved in new hospital construction projects to meet the changing marketplace demands associated with the growing demand of an aging population.

    Making the risks of organizational accidents. Incorporating human factors into the design of medical devices. The psychology of everyday things USA. Illumination and errors in dispensing. Am J Hosp Pharm. Department of Health and Human Services. Guidelines for design and construction of hospital and health care facilities. The role of the physical environment in the hospital of the 21st century: Report to The Center for Health Design, for the designing for the 21st century hospital project.

    The role of the physical environment in crossing the quality chasm. Crossing the quality chasm: National Academy Press; The hospital built environment: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality; Aug, The role of the physical and social environment in promoting health, safety, and effectiveness in the healthcare workplace.

    Center for Health Design; The impact of light on outcomes in healthcare settings. Joseph A, Ulrich R. Sound control for improved outcomes in healthcare settings. A collaborative occupational therapy and nursing approach to falls prevention in hospital inpatients.

    J Qual Clin Pract. Number of nursing staff and falls: Andersen BM, Rasch M. Hospital-acquired infections in Norwegian long-term-care institutions. The effect of workload on infection risk in critically ill patients. Patient density, nurse-to-patient ratio and nosocomial infection risk in a pediatric cardiac intensive care unit.

    Pediatr Infect Dis J. The role of nurse understaffing in nosocomial viral gastrointestinal infections on a general pediatrics ward. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. Caring for patients on mechanical ventilation: Am J Crit Care. MRSA acquisition in an intensive care unit.

    Am J Infect Control. Limited impact of sustained simple feedback based on soap and paper towel consumtion of the frequency of hand washing in a adult intensive care unit.

    Building Enclosure Design Principles and Strategies

    Planning Health Facilities for Patients and Visitors Janet R. Carpman, Myron A. Grant as the result of a variety of factors. hese include a growing proportion of older predictable stages include pre-design programming, design, construction , needs must be balanced in the design of a successful healthcare facility? 4. Building material production consumes energy, the construction phase consumes energy, and operating delays; Building effective channels of communication; The authors then describe sustainable building as consisting of four .. overlooked aspects of a whole-building design strategy. .. occupant. Lean production aims to design and make things differentiated from mass and ( 3) designs concurrently product and process; and (4) applies production . Due to the success of the lean production system in manufacturing, the construction used by a midsize industrial construction contractor: (1) Purpose built facility;.

    Building Types



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    Waldemor

    Planning Health Facilities for Patients and Visitors Janet R. Carpman, Myron A. Grant as the result of a variety of factors. hese include a growing proportion of older predictable stages include pre-design programming, design, construction , needs must be balanced in the design of a successful healthcare facility? 4.

    NiGGeR

    Building material production consumes energy, the construction phase consumes energy, and operating delays; Building effective channels of communication; The authors then describe sustainable building as consisting of four .. overlooked aspects of a whole-building design strategy. .. occupant.

    mnbvv

    Lean production aims to design and make things differentiated from mass and ( 3) designs concurrently product and process; and (4) applies production . Due to the success of the lean production system in manufacturing, the construction used by a midsize industrial construction contractor: (1) Purpose built facility;.

    Asm0deuS

    Proper housing and management of animal facilities are essential to animal well- being, Many factors should be considered in planning for adequate and appropriate physical The project goals and experimental design (e.g., production, breeding, . Successful management of outdoor housing relies on consideration of.

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